Welcome to 911UK
The only place for Porsche, 911uk is the definitive enthusiast and resource site for the Porsche 911.
Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free, so join up today for full access to the site and benefit from latest member offers.

Porsche Classifieds
Porsche Buyers Guides
Sell Your Porsche on 911uk
Create a Free Classified Advert
Search Ads
Classified Adverts FAQ
Trade Classified Information
Buyer & Seller Fraud Protection
Consumer Rights Act
Pre Purchase Inspection (PPI)
Porsche Car Sourcing
Porsche Cars Wanted
Official Porsche Centre Reviews
Model
Stock
Porsche 911
991 : 2011- 14
997 : 2004- 79
996 : 1997-2005 46
993 : 1993-1998 5
964 : 1989-1993 6
Carrera 3.2 : 1983-1989 0
Carrera SC : 1977-1983 1
930 Turbo : 1975-1989 0
Early 911 : 1964-1977 0
Porsche Other Models
Classic : 1950-1965 0
Boxster : 1997- 13
Cayman : 2005- 18
Cayenne : 2003- 8
Macan : 2014- 4
Panamera : 2009- 1
912-914-924-928-944-968 3
959 - CarreraGT - RaceCar 1
Car Parts For Sale & Wanted
Other Items For Sale & Wanted
Wheels Tyres For Sale & Wanted
Number Plates For Sale Wanted

Porsche Services
Porsche Body Shop Repair
Paint Protection & Wrapping
Porsche Classic Insurance
Porsche Classic Parts
Porsche Classic Restoration
Porsche Design Collection
Porsche Engine Gearbox Rebuild
Porsche Heritage & History
Porsche News
Porsche Picture Gallery
Win a New Porsche 911

Porsche Parts
Body Parts, Body Styling
Brakes, Clearance
Electrical, Exhausts
Engine Cooling, Engine Electrical
Engine Rebuild, Heating Cooling
Interior Incar, Lighting
Rubber Seals, Service Parts
Steering, Suspension
Transmission, Workshop Tools
Early 911, 911 - 930, 928 - 968
964 - 993, 996 - 997, Boxster
Cayman, Cayenne, Panamera

Porsche Model Range
911 [991] 2011-Current
Porsche 911 [991]
911 [997] 2004-Current
Porsche 911 [997]
911 [GT] GT1-GT2-GT3
Porsche 911 [GT]
911 [996] 1997-2005
Porsche 911 [996]
911 [993] 1993-1998
Porsche 911 [993]
911 [RS] RS-RSR
Porsche 911 [RS]
911 [964] 1989-1993
Porsche 911 [964]
911 3.2 1983-1989
Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera
911 SC 1977-1983
Porsche 911 SC
911 [Early] 1964-1977
Porsche 911 [Early]
Boxster & Cayman
Porsche Boxster & Cayman
Cayenne & Panamera
Porsche Cayenne & Panamera

911uk Site Partners

Post new topic   Reply to topic
Author Message
Porsche News
Motoring Editor
Motoring Editor


Joined: 08 Feb 2008
Posts: 6998



PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:37 pm    Post subject: Checklist for Driving in Mainland Europe Reply with quote

European Driving Checklist for British Drivers

This essential checklist will help you plan for your trip abroad and stay safe while away.

Info correct at time of posting.

IMPORTANT DOCUMENTS:
• Full, valid driving licence and national
insurance number
• Proof of vehicle insurance
• Proof of ID (passport)
• V5C Certificate
• Travel insurance documents
• European Breakdown Cover policy number and documents
• Before you travel ensure your vehicle’s tax and MOT are valid and up-to-date
• Crit’air sticker (If driving in France)

France has introduced 'Crit’air' (clean air) windscreen stickers as a legal requirement in some of its cities, to identify a vehicle’s emissions levels and to, in some cases, restrict access in order to improve air quality.

British drivers heading to France are advised that driving without a French 'clean air' sticker, called a Crit'Air vignette – which costs as little as €5 – makes them culpable for an on-the-spot fine of up to £117.

EQUIPMENT:
• Reflective jackets (there must be one for each passenger and be kept within the cabin of the car).
• Warning triangle (compulsory in most countries)
• Headlamp beam deflectors (depending on your car, you’ll either need deflector stickers or have to adjust the beam manually)
• Breathalyser (compulsory in France)
• Safety helmets are compulsory for riders and passengers of motorcyclists and moped users
• GB car sticker (if you don’t have a GB Euro number plate)
• First aid kit (compulsory in Austria, France and Germany)

OPTIONAL RECOMMENDED:
• Fire extinguisher
• Replacement bulbs
• A high quality torch
• Additional engine oil and water (for topping up)
• An up-to-date road map or satellite navigation system
• Photocopies of important documents
• European Health Insurance card

Useful information
• Drive carefully and cautiously - remember the local driving style may be very different to that of the UK.
• We recommend that you get your vehicle serviced/checked before making any long journey, but particularly if you are planning to drive to Europe.
• Don’t forget most European countries drive on the right-hand side of the road (the exceptions are: the UK, Irish Republic, Cyprus and Malta).
• You may be able to save time on your journey if you purchase a toll card in advance of travelling to France, Spain and Portugal. Follow this link for more information. www.saneftolling.co.uk
• Motorways in France are privately managed so law states that if you break down you must use the roadside emergency telephones or dial 112 as we cannot send out assistance. You’ll be put through to the police or motorway services operators who’ll send out a rescue company to come to your aid, if they dont then call your European Breakdown company number.
• You may have to pay labour and towing charges on the spot but we will cover these charges as long as the vehicle is towed to the recovery company’s depot.
• On a motorway, if you have a breakdown, it is vitally important that you get all people out of the car immediately, put your high-vis jackets on and move to a safe position.

Travelling with children
The driver of the vehicle is responsible for ensuring that all passengers under 18 are wearing a seat belt or appropriate restraint.

Child car seats
Children under the age of 10 are not allowed to travel on the front seats of vehicles without using a special child restraint, unless there is no rear seat in the vehicle, or the rear seat is already occupied with children under 10, or there are no seat belts.

Unlike the UK the use of child car seats is not determined on height but on weight. Under French law, children up to the age of 10 or less than 1.4 metres tall must travel in an approved child seat or restraint.

Weight
Group 0: < 10 kg - Rear-facing child seat placed either at the front passenger seat or at the back seat (if placed at the front, the airbag must be switched off). Babies can also travel in a carry cot (this can be placed at the rear seat only).
Group 0+: < 13 kg - Child restraints in this category are slightly bigger versions of those in Group 0. They must be installed under the same conditions as those in Group 0.
Group 1: 9 - 18 kg - Child seat with a harness or a protection tray.
Group 2: 15 - 25 kg - Booster seat or cushion with an adult seatbelt.
Group 3: 22 - 36 kg - Booster seat or cushion with an adult seatbelt.
_________________
>Competitive Porsche Insurance <



Like 911UK ON FACEBOOK


Last edited by Porsche News on Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:46 pm; edited 2 times in total
 



DrivingLawsEU.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  256.3 KB
 Viewed:  970 Time(s)

DrivingLawsEU.jpg



CheckList.png
 Description:
 Filesize:  28.48 KB
 Viewed:  987 Time(s)

CheckList.png


  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Porsche News
Motoring Editor
Motoring Editor


Joined: 08 Feb 2008
Posts: 6998



PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:41 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You're involved in a road accident abroad

If you're involved in a road accident on holiday there may be extra complications and difficulties to deal with. This explains what you should do if you're involved in a road accident while travelling abroad.

At the scene of the accident
If you're involved in a road accident abroad, make sure the police are called and that you get a copy of the police report. If you don’t understand what you're being told, ask for an interpreter. If possible:

• make notes about what happened
• get photographs of the accident - including pictures of the number plates of the other vehicles involved and their positions
• exchange insurance details
• take the names and addresses of as many witnesses as possible
• don't admit liability or apologise.

If you’re driving in Europe you may have been given a European Accident Statement (EAS) by your insurance company or one may be provided at the scene of the accident. The European Accident Statement (EAS) is a standard form available throughout Europe in various languages. The EAS helps get an agreed statement of facts about the accident and can help with insurance claims. Only sign the EAS when you're sure that you understand the situation. Make sure you’re given a copy of the accident statement.

See below for a copy of the EAS in English.

What happens next?
You should contact your insurer as soon as possible. What happens next will depend on whether the vehicle you were driving was hired and what kind of insurance cover you have arranged.

Make sure you tell your insurer about the accident as soon as you can, even if you don’t want to make a claim. Insurance policies have a time limit for reporting accidents and if you fail to meet this you may not be covered. You should give your insurance firm as much information about the accident as you can, as it will help them process your claim.

You should check your car insurance is valid abroad before you travel. Ideally, contact your insurer at least a month before taking your vehicle abroad. If you haven’t checked your policy you may find that you don’t have the same level of insurance as at home. Many insurers offer third-party cover while overseas, not comprehensive cover. This could leave you out-of-pocket if there is damage to your car. If you are going to be driving outside the European Union you should also apply for a Green Card, which proves you have the minimum legal requirement of third-party liability insurance. You can usually get a Green Card from your insurer who may charge you a small fee.

Accidents with uninsured drivers

If the accident happened in:

• a European Union country
• Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland

and was caused by an uninsured driver, you may be able to claim compensation from the country where the accident happened. You claim through the country’s equivalent of the Motor Insurers' Bureau. You can find out more information about this from your insurance company or the British Embassy where you are staying.

Personal injury claims
If you’ve been involved in an accident abroad you may want to make a personal injury claim. However, this can be very complicated and expensive. If you are thinking of making a claim for an accident you had on holiday you should get legal advice.

Find details of local British embassies and consuls https://www.gov.uk/world/organisations
_________________
>Competitive Porsche Insurance <



Like 911UK ON FACEBOOK
 



road-sign-infographic.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  402.34 KB
 Viewed:  974 Time(s)

road-sign-infographic.jpg



European-Accident-Statement.pdf
 Description:

Download
 Filename:  European-Accident-Statement.pdf
 Filesize:  298.5 KB
 Downloaded:  22 Time(s)

  
View user's profile Send private message
   
alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13129
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 7:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Worth noting that the Crit’air sticker is only relevant if you plan to drive in certain cities. More here: https://www.crit-air.fr/en.html

To obtain your sticker you have to register your vehicles details and your name and address. The French authorities will then have your details on record, enabling them to chase up any fines with you if caught speeding, etc.

I'm not saying they can't already, if they want to, but by them having your details in their database, makes it easier for them.

Also worth noting what type of insurance your insurance company provide on your policy when travelling abroad. Some only provide the bare minimum as standard, i.e. 3rd party, fire & theft. Some of them honour the same deal you have in the UK, i.e. fully comp. Double check with your insurance though before you travel.
_________________
2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Used daily....rain, sun or snow.

 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Porsche News
Motoring Editor
Motoring Editor


Joined: 08 Feb 2008
Posts: 6998



PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Winter Tyres: EU Laws & Legislation

Please Note: the following had been created as a general guide to EU winter tyre laws and is not to be used as basis for legal requirements – always check with the appropriate Governmental Institution to ensure your compliance with current legislation.

In many countries within the European Union, the legal ramifications around the use of Winter Tyres are far stricter than in the UK. In fact there are a number of countries where motorists are unable to drive during the winter months without winter tyres fitted to their vehicle.

If you are planning on taking a trip abroad during winter, it is highly advised that you research the laws of the country and make sure that if you are driving your own car in a country, you have winter tyres fitted if this what the law requires.

This is a list of countries where there is either a law in place or where there are certain regional laws that require winter tyres to be fitted.

Austria:

In Austria, the law states that between 1st of November and the 15th of April, a car - that has a maximum weight 3.5 tonnes - can only drive in winter conditions (i.e. snow, ice, slush, etc) as long as winter tyres have been fitted. If an all-season tyre bears the "M + S" mark on the sidewall, these will be considered as an adequate alternative.

If you do not follow these laws, you risk a fine of around €5,000 as well as losing your vehicle to the impound lot.

There are also major ramifications to your insurance. If you are in an accident during the winter and you do not have winter tyres fitted to your car, then your policy will be deemed null & void.

Bosnia Herzegovina:

The motorists of Bosnia Herzegovina are required to fit winter tyres onto their vehicle from the 15th of November to the 15th of April. However, if a driver uses snow chains on their ‘normal’ summer tyres, then this is seen as an acceptable alternative.

Denmark:

During winter, Denmark experiences some very low temperatures. For this reason, the Government strongly recommend the use of winter tyres; however, Danish law does not require drivers to change to winter tyres.

Finland:

Finland suffers from some serious winter weather and as such the fitting of winter tyres is compulsory from the 1st of December to the end of February. When defining what constitutes a winter tyre, the law states that it must have the M&S symbol on its sidewall.

France:

As a general rule, the fitting of winter tyres is not compulsory. There are however, certain regions in the mountains that will indicate when the use of winter tyres is necessary.

Germany:

Recently, Germany added new rules to their Highway Code. According to the law, motorists must have winter tyres (that bear the M+S symbol) if they are driving on snow, black ice or roads covered in frost.

If you are caught driving in these conidtions withouth the appopriate tyres fitted, you are likely to be fined €40. This amount will be doubled if you are the reason for any delays to traffic. You will also lose one point on your driving license.

Hungary:

Fitting winter tyres is not a legal requirement. However, a vehicle must have snow chains onboard in case winter driving conditions become extreme.
When arriving at a border point, if there are signs up which indicate that snow chains must be fitted, only vehicles with satisfactory snow chains onboard is allowed to enter the country.

Iceland:

From the 1st of November up to 14th of April winter tyres are compulsory in Iceland. These dates are subject to change and if you are planning on visiting Iceland, you should check this out before driving during the winter.

Italy:

Winter tyres are not compulsory in Italy. However, if local signs indicate that snow chains should be carried in the vehicle, you are required to do so.
One region which differs is the Val d'Aosta area (in the north-west of the country). From the 15th of October to the 15th of April vehicles must be either fitted with winter tyres or snow chains.

Luxemburg:

The use of winter tyres is not compulsory. However, tyres which are deemed to be inappropriate for winter conditions are used then you could – and you are involved in an accident – then you could face fines as much as €145.00 as well as receiving the blame for the accident.

Poland:

You do not need to fit winter tyres according to Polish law. However, they are highly recommended by the Government, especially in rural areas. This is because there is very little in the way of snow clearing on the smaller country roads.

Norway:

Surprisingly, winter tyres are not compulsory here. That is unless there is ice or snow covering the roads. In this case winter tyres or tyres with snow chains fitted must be used.

Slovakia:

There are no specific laws in Slovakia concerning the use of winter tyres. However, in the case of an accident, if a motorist does not have winter tyres fitted to his/her vehicle they have a far greater chance of receive the responsibility of any damage incurred from the collision.

Sweden:

Winter tyres are mandatory from the 1st of December until the 31st of March. The winter tyres must also have a minimum tread depth of 3mm and the marking M&S on their sidewall.

Spain:

When driving in Spain, you will need to have winter tyres fitted if you spot a traffic sign indicating that winter tyres (or snow chains) are compulsory in that area.

Switzerland:

There are no specific laws in Switzerland concerning the use of winter tyres. However, in the case of an accident, if a motorist does not have winter tyres fitted to his/her vehicle they have a far greater chance of receive the responsibility of any damage incurred from the collision.

In certain areas there is a requirement to use winter tyres. Road signs are used to indicate to a driver whether or not they are on a road that winter tyres must be fitted.
_________________
>Competitive Porsche Insurance <



Like 911UK ON FACEBOOK
 



EuroWinterT.jpg
 Description:
 Filesize:  75.82 KB
 Viewed:  730 Time(s)

EuroWinterT.jpg


  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Zingari
Donnington
Donnington


Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Posts: 12294
Location: Cheshire

1993 Porsche 964 Anniversary

PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What's the best breakdown cover. Idealy I need it for me and Mrs Z but rather than one nominated car each to cover the person Dont know
_________________
Me? The 13th Duke of Wybourne? Here? In a sixth form girl's dormitory? At three o'clock in the morning? With my reputation? What were they thinking of?
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Johnd52
Nürburgring


Joined: 06 Oct 2014
Posts: 434
Location: North Yorkshire

2011 Porsche Cayman

PostPosted: Sun Feb 11, 2018 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zingari wrote:
What's the best breakdown cover. Idealy I need it for me and Mrs Z but rather than one nominated car each to cover the person Dont know


Green flag European cover works well for us. Does not matter what car you are in, even if you are just a passenger, you are covered.
_________________
Cayman GTS. No more PDK but still red.
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13129
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 6:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Are you sure? I thought there was a limit on the agae of the car, i.e. maximum of 16 years old. Dont know

Edit: taken from greenflag's website:

"A vehicle registered in the United Kingdom which
is under 11 years old since first registration (or under
16 years old if you have paid the appropriate
extra Premium)."
_________________
2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Used daily....rain, sun or snow.

 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Zingari
Donnington
Donnington


Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Posts: 12294
Location: Cheshire

1993 Porsche 964 Anniversary

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Also what's the craic with Monaco given this is not in Europe and insurance cover Dont know
_________________
Me? The 13th Duke of Wybourne? Here? In a sixth form girl's dormitory? At three o'clock in the morning? With my reputation? What were they thinking of?
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13129
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Same laws that apply to France.
_________________
2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Used daily....rain, sun or snow.

 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Zingari
Donnington
Donnington


Joined: 25 Oct 2009
Posts: 12294
Location: Cheshire

1993 Porsche 964 Anniversary

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 9:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

alex yates wrote:
Same laws that apply to France.


Yes but does EU insurance cover you or does it need to specify Monaco, Switzerland etc Dont know
_________________
Me? The 13th Duke of Wybourne? Here? In a sixth form girl's dormitory? At three o'clock in the morning? With my reputation? What were they thinking of?
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
911UK
Porsche Community
Porsche Community


Joined: 15 May 2002
Posts: 9552
Location: 911UK

1997 Porsche 993 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zingari wrote:
alex yates wrote:
Same laws that apply to France.


Yes but does EU insurance cover you or does it need to specify Monaco, Switzerland etc Dont know


Check your specific policy as they are probably included
_________________
Get a Porsche Car Insurance Quote


FOLLOW 911UK ON FACEBOOK
 
  
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail Visit poster's website
   
Johnd52
Nürburgring


Joined: 06 Oct 2014
Posts: 434
Location: North Yorkshire

2011 Porsche Cayman

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I understand from my insurers and GF that Europe means the geographical area and not the political union. Monaco is certainly covered for both.
_________________
Cayman GTS. No more PDK but still red.
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
infrasilver
Fast & Furious
Fast & Furious


Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 7557
Location: East Midlands

2001 Porsche 996 Targa

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It will say in your the cover note of your insurance but will include EU countries plus those within Europe... Monaco, Switzerland, Norway etc. You have to get all the way to Bosnia and beyond before your insurance and UK (European) breakdown becomes invalid.
ADAC breakdown does cover you for all of these Eastern European countries and some in North Africa and is probably the widest ranging cover and you are covered not the car, so I am covered in my 944 (31 years old) 996 (16 years old) or any car I drive.


The law on breathalysers does get misrepresented, it is NOT compulsory to carry one in France.

Quote:
"The enforcement of the law making it compulsory to carry breathalysers whilst driving in France has been postponed indefinitely. Whilst the law itself is still in place the authorities have recognised problems with the supply of suitable breathalysers and will not issue fines until further notice."

_________________
http://euroroadtripper.blogspot.co.uk/

 
  
View user's profile Send private message Visit poster's website
   
alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13129
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Zingari wrote:
alex yates wrote:
Same laws that apply to France.


Yes but does EU insurance cover you or does it need to specify Monaco, Switzerland etc Dont know


These are the usual countries specified by insurance companies when covered in Europe:

Andorra, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canary Islands, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Vatican State.


What you do need to know about driving in Monaco is minimum age is 18, so no 17 yr old sixth form girls doing the chauffeuring when you roll out of Jimmy'z nightclub at 4am Mr Z Hand


_________________
2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Used daily....rain, sun or snow.

 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Albionmuz
Monza


Joined: 28 Oct 2016
Posts: 239
Location: West Sussex


PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I think you’ll find that the breathalyser kit law was postponed indefinitely in France. Of course the AA and the like still tell you need one.
_________________
993 Targa manual
Alfa GTV Twinspark
Citroen Deux Chevaux
Alfa 159 Sportwagon
Porsche 968 Cab Tip
Lexus IS 200
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13129
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 6:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Albionmuz wrote:
I think you’ll find that the breathalyser kit law was postponed indefinitely in France. Of course the AA and the like still tell you need one.


As stated in the above post by infrasilver. Grin
_________________
2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Used daily....rain, sun or snow.

 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Magic919
Montreal


Joined: 05 Jun 2013
Posts: 609
Location: Berkshire


PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:17 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The Germans have a Low Emissions Zone scheme that requires a sticker for Stuttgart and some other cities.

Also worth mentioning the Vignette for Austria and for Switzerland.

Rules for Winter tyres vary across Europe and start around mid-October.
_________________
997.2 C2S PDK
997.2 C4S PDK
 
  
View user's profile Send private message
   
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic   All times are GMT - 12 Hours
Page 1 of 1

 
Jump to:  

You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum
You can attach files in this forum
You can download files in this forum
You can post calendar events in this forum