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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

alex yates wrote:
Just read a boxster thread on rentech where the owner drained the fluid out the tilt sensor thinking it was water only to realise it wasn't and thus destroyed the sensor.


Thanks, it did look like a lot to be accidental, that confirms it. I'll leave it well alone and just clean up the contacts.

MC
 
  
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alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13564
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yes - here's my video doing it:


Open Youtube Page

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2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Sun's out Gun's out.

 
  
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Dammit
Albert Park


Joined: 23 Sep 2016
Posts: 1658



PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

MisterCorn wrote:
Have you tried using a heat gun on the scuttle to bring it up? I bought a spare panel to play with some time ago and didn't have any success with it. It either did nothing at all or started to melt the surface. There was no middle ground. I was using a decent temperature controlled gun.

MC


I used the Gtechniq stuff, it came up perfectly black with about 30 seconds work. Get a cotton pad, hold over the end of the bottle, invert, wipe pad over scuttle, boom.
 
  
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alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13564
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Only lasts a couple of months though. Heat gun is back to factory standard finish out the mould tool.
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2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Sun's out Gun's out.

 
  
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Dammit
Albert Park


Joined: 23 Sep 2016
Posts: 1658



PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's lasted a year and a half so far, and no sign of going grey again - but then my car is usually garaged, if it's left outside then I imagine it'd go grey faster.

I'll give it a 30 second wipe over when I next wash it, that should be good until 2020.

Personal preference ultimately, I guess.
 
  
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alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13564
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I did it religiously that way for 3 years, then one day got sick of polishing a turd and after numerous posts on here from some well respected clued up members and on other forums I decided to try the heat gun and , err....'saw the heat' so to speak.

I was annoyed at the time as I'd sprayed my front bumper internal trim black that had faded white, only to find out I could have done that too with a heat gun.

Convert ever since!
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2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Sun's out Gun's out.

 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'll give it another go on my spare panel and report back Thumb

MC
 
  
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alex yates
Brands Hatch
Brands Hatch


Joined: 06 Mar 2014
Posts: 13564
Location: The Ribble Valley, Lancashire

2000 Porsche 996 Carrera 4

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:41 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Patience is the key. Keep it slow. It's like magic watching it and quite theraputic. Thumb
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2000 Manual 996 C4 Arctic Silver Convertible

Sun's out Gun's out.

 
  
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deMort
Shanghai


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 4916
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 8:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Foam panel looks fine .. mice chew big holes in it and over time it can lift .. its held in place by Butil ( windscreen sealent ) .. yours seems solid though .

You remove that to replace the heater matrix .

Have a quick look under the inlet manifold as well .. look for leaves or the droppings you found as thats another place they love and there they tend to chew through wires .... knock sensor being the main one.


EDIT ..

Judgeing by the corrosion on the tilt sensor pins then i think its had it .

there was a mod to fit a new system under the passenger seat as this corrosion is pretty common .

You can also remove it and code it off if not needed .

You HAVE to code it off though if removed .. it triggers the alarm in the early hours if not .
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wasz
Magny-Cours


Joined: 28 Dec 2012
Posts: 2515


1999 Porsche 996 Carrera 2

PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2018 9:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Just shows there are still bargain 996s to be had out there!

How rusty is it?
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 2:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I haven't had it up on the ramp to get underneath and assess the rust fully yet, but from what I have seen so far and from getting my head underneath it looks pretty good.

I have just about finished off cleaning up around the scuttle area.




New cabin air filter is also in place.

I have modified the battery tray so that I can fit on an SBS30 lightweight battery. These are a gel battery which are fantastic at producing high cranking currents, don't mind being discharged, and hold the charge practically forever. I have had one on my Westfield for years and use one to power my watch winder in my safe. I got a job lot of them years ago and many are still going despite being 20 years old!!
I have made up some brackets for the tray and will make up a hold down strap. Full details later. The tray is being repainted along with the alloy brackets and the alarm bracket.



The tray was rubbed down with a wire brush, degreased, treated with Jenolite, then cleaned again and painted with grey primer. It will be finished with two coats of humbrol enamel.

I also popped the engine cover to check for any other 'guests' . No evidence of any extra passengers in there.
MC

Last edited by MisterCorn on Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:29 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
  
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infrasilver
Fast & Furious
Fast & Furious


Joined: 04 Oct 2010
Posts: 7654
Location: East Midlands

2001 Porsche 996 Targa

PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 2:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Watching with interest, it is a sunroof model? I can't quite tell, great body shape for a RWD track focused car if it's a non-sunroof?
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 3:07 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

infrasilver wrote:
Watching with interest, it is a sunroof model? I can't quite tell, great body shape for a RWD track focused car if it's a non-sunroof?


It is a sunroof model. But I plan to convert to non-sunroof when I get the paint done.

MC
 
  
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Marky911
Albert Park


Joined: 04 Jun 2009
Posts: 1663



PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 5:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Good stuff. I'm liking the bracket work.

The scuttle area clean and battery are on my list. I'm cheating though as I have a one of these in the garage ready.

http://www.rennline.com/Rennline-Battery-Mount-Kit-Odyssey-680-or-VPR-P6-Porsche/productinfo/EL30%2E37/


I'm going to try one of these in mine. Rich CLR has one in his. -

https://rover.ebay.com/rover/0/0/0?mpre=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.co.uk%2Fulk%2Fitm%2F301213254470


Great progress again. I wish I had that amount of time for tinkering.

Thumb
 
  
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kurlykris
Watkins Glen


Joined: 30 Jun 2014
Posts: 2132
Location: Warwickshire


PostPosted: Thu Feb 01, 2018 11:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another MC thread that I`ve missed PC

Are you cornering the market on 996.1`s MC worship
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1998 996.1 C2 3.4 with "Aerokit Cup"
2006 Boxster S sport chrono
2010 Mercedes E350 AMG Sport

 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Fri Feb 02, 2018 5:02 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

kurlykris wrote:
Another MC thread that I`ve missed PC

Are you cornering the market on 996.1`s MC worship


Not really, I just have a terrible lack of self control.

MC
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Mon Feb 05, 2018 1:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I decided to take the scuttle cover off to clean properly behind it, it would need to come off later for when the screen is changed anyway so no big deal.
Remove the screw each side under the small covers, along with the one in the centre. Take off the 13mm nuts under the covers which hold the wiper arms on, remove the arms. Undo the two screws behind where the battery sits, undo the electrical connectors for the heated washers and the water pipe for the washers. Then with the bonnet down wiggle it out of the way.





Whilst this is off I also removed the two diagonal supports to clean them up a bit, not that they are very bad, but this will also give me better access to the wiring loom which I will wrap in loom tape to make it look tidier.

I also had a problem with sticky knobs on my CDR22, this is a very common problem apparently. I pulled them off, cleaned the sticky off them with a combination of brake cleaner and IPA, then gave them a thick couple of coats of Plastidip. They look a whole lot better and are no longer sticky.



MC

Last edited by MisterCorn on Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:30 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
  
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MisterCorn
Long Beach


Joined: 08 Jan 2011
Posts: 6019
Location: Nottingham, England

2004 Porsche 996 Turbo

PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:11 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

With the scuttle cover off I have had a better look at the foam. There is definite evidence of damage to one corner of it, it is also unglued along this edge. I wonder if this is the source of my water leak?



From looking at it the heater feed and return pipes need to be disconnected to get access to remove and replace the foam. So I'll wait until the coolant is drained when the engine comes out for this.

Battery brackets are just about done. There is one each side of the battery which are held in place by a couple of rivnuts on each side in the tray. The aluminium channel which goes along the top will screw in to a rivnut in the battery tray at one end, and in to one of the standard holes at the other end. I need to sort out battery terminals for the battery and to drill the two holes in the aluminium channel but you get the idea. I might paint it blue when I get more body work done.







I drilled an extra drain hole in the tray as the large rivnut fills the original one when fitted.

I finished off cleaning up the alarm unit and tilt sensor for refitting.




Seriously cold in the garage this week so haven't done much.

MC

Last edited by MisterCorn on Wed Apr 18, 2018 3:31 pm; edited 1 time in total
 
  
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Osh
Sepang


Joined: 19 Nov 2012
Posts: 2766
Location: Bristol


PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Great write up MC

Looking forward to watching the progress... Thumb


Osh
 
  
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deMort
Shanghai


Joined: 21 Mar 2015
Posts: 4916
Location: Brighton


PostPosted: Wed Feb 07, 2018 8:47 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Foam panel replacement ..

Clamp both pipes , remove , you will loose a little coolant but no big deal .

remove old foam panel and clean the area .

Now the good bit ..

new foam panel is on a sheet of non stick backing .. dont remove it ..

tear out a large hole in the center so that the panel butil / sticky bit still has the covering on it .. then feed it over the pipes and into place.

At that point tear and pull away the covering and stick it down .

instructions dont tell you this and attempting to fit it with out this cover will be grief !
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